Category Archives: Environment friendly

Recycling for livelihood projects

I saw this announcement by Papemelroti on their Facebook page last year. I think the recycling program is on hold due to general community quarantine (GCQ). However, this is still worth sharing.

The purpose of which is to reduce, reuse and recycle items found in our homes to lessen the trash accumulating on our landfills and seas.

For any inquiries, please go to this page https://shop.papemelroti.com/pages/contact-us

Store locations https://shop.papemelroti.com/pages/locations

The following items are being accepted by the company for donations. They must be clean and in good condition for them to reuse the items for their livelihood projects.

• OLD EYE GLASS LENSES
• SCRABBLE TILES
• DOMINOES
• COMPUTER KEYBOARD
• TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
• CLEAN PLASTIC BAGS
• HARDBOUND BOOKS
• PLAYING CARDS
• OLD WATCHES
• BUBBLE WRAPPING

Only the items listed will be accepted – Papelmeroti

Do-it-yourself fabric face mask

About a month ago health experts said face mask should be worn only when necessary (mag mask ka lang kung may ubo at sipon ka). But wearing face mask has now become necessary to be worn when going out because of the pandemic.

The lack of supply in the market has driven many to make their own face mask using different types of colorful fabric.

Image by Gabriele Lässer from Pixabay

I’ve discovered three ways to make face mask through this website.

Here are a few DIY mask tips from Today.com:

DIY face mask supplies

Depending on your method, you might need some or all of the following:

  • Fabric
  • Scissors
  • Needle and thread
  • Sewing machine (if you have one)
  • Rubber band or elastics
  • Ruler

Fabric

  • The ideal fabric is tightly woven 100% cotton
  • Try to avoid anything with too much stretch
  • In a pinch, if you don’t have cotton, you can use pillowcases, tea towels, thick T-shirts or vacuum bags
  • Scarves and bandannas also work

How to make a mask with fabric without sewing:

Jenny Chang-Rodriguez / TODAY
  1. Use a square scarf or a cut a large square out of a T-shirt (at least 20 inches by 20 inches).
  2. Fold two sides of the square in to meet each other in the middle then fold this in half lengthwise. You should be left with a long rectangle with the edges sandwiched inside.
  3. Grab two hair ties (or rubber bands) and pull one around each end of the long rectangle, roughly breaking the rectangle into thirds. (It should almost look like a candy wrapper.)
  4. Fold each outside third of fabric into the center.
  5. Pull the mask on by fitting the hair elastic around ears and making sure the end tails of fabric are against your face so the mask stays put.

How to make a face mask with fabric using needle and thread:

Jenny Chang-Rodriguez / TODAY
  1. Cut two pieces of fabric that are equally sized (measure your face to see how wide/long you need them to be).
  2. Take the two layers of your 100% cotton fabric or substitute. If you’re working with patterns, face the two sides together (like you’re making a sandwich).
  3. Place the elastic or ties (*see instructions below) in between the layers and sew them into the corner. For elastics, sew one at each end so it creates a loop on each side. For ties, use one piece at each corner so there are four total.
  4. Make three staggered pleats lengthwise on the mask, as if folding a paper fan. Then sew all the way around. This will make a rectangular mask.

How to make a face mask with fabric using a sewing machine:

Jenny Chang-Rodriguez / TODAY
  1. Cut four pieces of fabric that are equally sized (measure your face to see how wide/long you need them to be).
  2. Pair up two of the four pieces together so they are symmetrical. Sew the center seams (curved part that covers your nose) together. Repeat with the remaining two pieces.
  3. Get your ties ready (*see instructions below). Take one tie from the 11-inch piece and one from the 9.5-inch piece. The longer piece will go on the top of the mask (where it would touch your nose) and the shorter will go on the bottom.
  4. Place the two sewn pieces of fabric on top of each other (like a sandwich) so they’re symmetrical. Place ties on the corners of one side of the mask. They should meet the edge of the mask and then go inside of the mask.
  5. On the edge of the mask, you should see the following: one layer of mask, the ribbon/tie and another layer of mask. Sew the edges so they are all sewn together.
  6. Next, repeat this step for the other side with your remaining ties, making sure to pair ties up so they’re the same length and are symmetrical on both sides. Sew around the mask but keep one side open so you can turn the mask inside out.
  7. Turn it inside out and sew the gap closed.

How to make elastics for your mask:

  1. To make your elastics, you can use ribbon or more of the fabric you’re using for the mask.
  2. You will roughly need one 11-inch and one 9.5-inch long strip of fabric, both of which are 1 inch in width.
  3. Cut the two strips in half and place them aside (follow sewing instructions for the mask above).

Images and steps in doing the face mask is not mine.

Give forward by bringing back

I think I have found a solution to my problem of disposing old clothes and old school uniforms that have been bugging me for a long time.

Image by kiekvanna from Pixabay

My son gave me this pamphlet from a popular shopping retail company. The pamphlet said the store accepts old clothes in whatever form they may be. The goal is to:

REWEAR (clothes that can be worn again);

REUSE (textiles that are no longer suitable to wear are converted into other products, such as cleaning cloths);

RECYCLE (textiles that can’t be reused get a new chances as textile fibres, or are used to manufacture products such as damping and insulation materials fro the auto industry.

The company’s collecting initiatives aims to lessen the clothes and textiles that end up in landfills when 95 percent could be used again.

“The H&M garment collecting initiative has been created to decrease the waste and close the fashion loop. So if you’ve got something worn, torn, or hopelessly out of style – don’t throw it away or let it pile up in the back of our wardrobe. Bring back all your unwanted clothes and home textiles to your local H&M store.”

As a token for the effort in bringing your old clothes to the store, they will be giving voucher (for each bag you hand in) with a discount for your next purchase. Please visit their website hm.com/garment-collecting ico-spirit.com to know more about this initiative.

I’ll be sorting more old clothes this week to free additional space in the cabinet and do my share in reducing waste from old clothes and textiles.